All Stories

  1. Life

    Your face is mighty mite-y. And that’s a good thing

    Tiny face mites live in our pores, getting food and shelter in return for eating our skin waste. A new study shows they can’t live without us.

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  2. Fossils

    Warm feathers may have helped dinos survive mass Triassic die-off

    Dinosaurs may have weathered freezing conditions about 202 million years ago, thanks to warm feathery coats.

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  3. Climate

    Let’s learn about heat waves

    Heat waves often occur when a high-pressure system lingers over a certain area. These deadly events are on the rise due to climate change.

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  4. Psychology

    Scientists Say: Trauma

    No one experiences trauma the same way. Its effects can be physical or emotional. Immediate or delayed. Brief or long-lasting.

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  5. Earth

    Earth’s rock collection hints at how to search for life elsewhere

    A new way to sort minerals focuses on how they formed. It provides new clues about Earth’s crystal past and how to find life on other planets.

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  6. Animals

    The top side of an elephant’s trunk is surprisingly stretchy

    Research on elephant trunks could inspire new artificial skins for soft robots.

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  7. Fossils

    This big dino had tiny arms before T. rex made them cool

    A predecessor to Tyrannosaurus rex, Meraxes gigas had a giant head. But the muscularity of its puny arms suggests those limbs served some purpose.

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  8. Plants

    This pitcher plant lures insects into underground deathtraps

    Scientists didn’t expect the carnivorous, eggplant-shaped pitchers to be sturdy enough to grow embedded in the soil.

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  9. Health & Medicine

    Six months in space causes 10 years’ worth of bone loss

    Even a year after recovery back on Earth, astronauts who’d been in space six months or more still had bone loss equal to a decade of aging.

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  10. Animals

    Gophers might be farmers, a controversial study suggests

    Pocket gophers air out and fertilize the soil in a way that amounts to simple farming, two researchers claim. But not everyone agrees.

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  11. Chemistry

    Scientists Say: Pigment

    From fruits to fur to fine art, many materials get their colors from compounds called pigments.

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  12. Fossils

    Great white sharks may be partly to blame for the end of megalodons

    Zinc levels in shark teeth hint that megalodons and great whites competed for food — and great whites won.

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