Physics

  1. Earth

    Explainer: Sprites, jets, ELVES and other storm-powered lights

    Fleeting glows collectively known as “transient luminous events” flash in the skies above powerful lightning storms.

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  2. Physics

    Here’s why blueberries aren’t blue — but appear to be

    Blueberries actually have dark red pigments — no blue ones — in their skin. Tiny structures in the fruits’ waxy coat are what make them seem blue.

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  3. Earth

    The weird sky glow called STEVE is really confusing scientists

    Researchers are trying to figure out the recipe of atmospheric conditions that creates this aurora-like light show.

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  4. Physics

    Physics explains what happens when a lawn sprinkler sucks in water

    Experiments with a floating sprinkler revealed the surprisingly complex physics behind a simple question.

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  5. Physics

    Physics explains why poured water burbles the way it does

    The loudness of falling water depends on the height of the pour and the thickness of the stream.

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  6. Materials Science

    Scientists Say: 2-D Material

    Two-dimensional materials such as graphene could improve electronics, carbon capture and more.

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  7. Physics

    How much fruit can you pull from a display before it topples?

    About 10 percent of the fruit in a tilted market display can be removed before it will crash down, computer models show.

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  8. Materials Science

    Let’s learn about graphene

    Scientists have been trying to understand and harness this material’s superpowers since its discovery in 2004.

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  9. Physics

    Scientists Say: Polarized light

    Sunlight, lamplight and other lights are usually unpolarized. But passing light waves through filters can ‘polarize’ them.

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  10. Physics

    Neutrons are unveiling hidden secrets of fossils and artifacts

    Images made with these particles have revealed details of dinosaur bones, mummies and more.

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  11. Physics

    Scientists Say: Coriolis Effect

    Because Earth spins, airborne objects traveling far and fast — such as airplanes — experience deflections in their motion.

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  12. Physics

    Before the ancient Egyptians, nature may have carved sphinxes

    Steady ‘winds’ can carve clay blobs into lion-shaped landforms called yardangs, a new study suggests. One such yardang may have inspired the Great Sphinx of Giza.

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