Physics

  1. Tech

    New thermal ‘cloak’ keeps spaces from getting too hot or too cold

     A prototype fabric could help keep cars, buildings and other spaces cooler during heat waves while also reducing greenhouse-gas emissions.

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  2. Chemistry

    Scientists Say: Valence electrons

    These far-out electrons do the hard work when it comes to chemical reactions.

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  3. Space

    Ghost particles paint a new picture of the Milky Way

    Scientists tracked neutrinos from space to create a new map of our galaxy. It’s the first image of the Milky Way to be made without light.

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  4. Space

    Newfound gravitational waves may be from the biggest black holes in the universe

    Observations of dead stars hint that ripples in spacetime — ripples light-years long — roll through our universe.

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  5. Plants

    A single particle of light can kick off photosynthesis

    In a new experiment with bacteria, a lone photon sparked the process of turning light to chemical energy.

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  6. Materials Science

    This house is partly made of recycled diapers

    After being washed, dried, sanitized and shredded, used diapers were mixed with other materials to make a strong concrete.

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  7. Space

    Lightning dances through Jupiter’s skies much like it does on Earth 

    Data from NASA’s Juno spacecraft hint that Jupiter’s lightning extends in jagged steps as it does on Earth.

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  8. Physics

    Explainer: What is chaos theory?

    Chaos can help scientists explore subjects from climate change to human brains. Learn about the theory behind this field of science.

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  9. Math

    Scientists Say: Parabola

    A parabola is a U-shaped curve, where every point along that curve is the same distance from another point and a line.

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  10. Math

    Scientists Say: Ellipse

    Ellipse describes the shapes of planetary orbits around their stars and explains the wacky acoustic phenomenon of “whispering chambers.”

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  11. Physics

    Shouting into the wind may seem futile — but it’s really not

    Sending a sound upwind, against the flow of air, actually makes the sound louder — only it doesn’t sound that way to the person making the noise.

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  12. Physics

    Scientists Say: Explosion

    Explosions happen when chemical or nuclear reactions blow out a lot of heat, noise and expanding gas.

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