Psychology

  1. Psychology

    Boredom may pose a public health threat in the social distancing era

    Boredom contributes to pandemic fatigue, and it may account for why some people don’t follow social distancing rules.

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  2. Health & Medicine

    Teen depression linked to how the brain processes rewards

    Depression in teens alters their brains’ pathways in ways that may put those kids at risk of lifelong mental-health problems — unless they get help.

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  3. Brain

    Study is first to link brainwaves to certain forms of thought

    Electrical activity in the brain reveals when we are focused or allowing our minds to wander freely.

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  4. Brain

    Loneliness makes our brains crave people

    An area of the brain that lights up when hungry people see food also revs up when lonely people see social activities.

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  5. Psychology

    Can’t remember? Maybe you multitask too much between screens

    Splitting your attention between devices can make it hard to create new memories, even when you’re not multitasking.

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  6. Health & Medicine

    Social distancing for teens shouldn’t mean giving up your social life

    During even partial lockdowns, keeping connected with friends makes all the difference. That’s what athletes and other teen groups are finding.

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  7. Science & Society

    Suffering from racist acts can prompt Black teens to constructive action

    Stress from experiencing racist acts can lead Black teens to recognize and confront racism and fight for social justice.

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  8. Health & Medicine

    Scientists Say: Puberty

    Puberty is a time when hormones surge and people develop the ability to have children. But it’s so much more than that.

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  9. Brain

    Kids use more of the brain than adults do to process language

    The brain continues to grow and mature throughout childhood. One big change occurs in which parts of the brain turn on as someone processes language.

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  10. Psychology

    Handwriting beats typing when it comes to taking class notes

    Taking notes with a pen or pencil triggers activity in parts of the brain important for memory and for storing new information.

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  11. Psychology

    You should guess answers to your homework before searching online

    Over a span of 11 years, an increasing share of students performed more poorly on exams than on their homework. Online homework help may explain why.

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  12. Brain

    Confidence can make you miss important information

    Being confident can feed a confirmation bias in us, new studies show. This bias can make your brain ignore other people’s ideas and any conflicting information.

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