MS-ESS2-3

Analyze and interpret data on the distribution of fossils and rocks, continental shapes, and seafloor structures to provide evidence of the past plate motions.

More Stories in MS-ESS2-3

  1. Oceans

    Scientists Say: Atoll

    Atolls form when coral reefs build up around underwater volcanoes.

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  2. Earth

    Fin whales could help scientists map what lies below the seafloor

    Fin-whale calls are loud enough to penetrate into Earth’s crust, offering scientists a new way to study the properties of the ocean floor.

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  3. Earth

    Rock rising from below the Atlantic may drive continents apart

    Molten rock rising from the deep mantle at the Mid-Atlantic Ridge may drive plate tectonics there more than had been expected.

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  4. Fossils

    The challenge of dinosaur hunting in deep caves

    Spelunkers aren’t the only people to find caves interesting. So do paleontologists. Though getting to work may be harrowing, they find it’s worth it.

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  5. Earth

    A rainforest once grew near the South Pole

    A forest flourished within 1,000 kilometers of the South Pole. That was a while ago, as in millions of years ago.

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  6. Earth

    Study appears to rule out volcanic burps as causing dino die-offs

    New data on when massive volcanic eruptions happened do not match when the dinosaur mass extinction took place.

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  7. Earth

    Explainer: Earth — layer by layer

    Explore the sizzling heat, unimaginable pressures — and some surprise diamonds — that sit beneath our feet. This is the side of Earth that you can’t see.

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  8. Earth

    Explainer: Understanding geologic time

    Geologic time is unimaginably long. Geologists puzzle it out using a calendar called the Geologic Time Scale.

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  9. Earth

    Scientists Say: Continent

    A continent is a large land mass. Geologists recognize six of them — Africa, Antarctica, Eurasia, Australia, North America and South America.

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