HS-ESS2-1

Develop a model to illustrate how Earth's internal and surface processes operate at different spatial and temporal scales to form continental and ocean-floor features.

More Stories in HS-ESS2-1

  1. Earth

    Tiny gemstones show when Earth’s crust first started moving

    Chemical hints observed in zircons suggest when the important process of plate tectonics first took off.

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  2. Earth

    Scientists Say: Richter Scale

    The Richter scale and other magnitude measures reveal the strength of an earthquake.

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  3. Earth

    Volcanic avalanches may be more destructive than previously thought

    Pressures within these pyroclastic flows may be as much as three times as high as observations had suggested.

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  4. Earth

    The ‘Doomsday’ glacier may soon trigger a dramatic sea-level rise

    The ice shelf that had kept it in place could fail within five years. That would speed the glacier’s slip into the ocean, boosting a rise in sea levels.

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  5. Earth

    Scientists Say: Avalanche

    The word avalanche usually refers to a huge snowslide down a mountain, but it can also be used to describe any large mass of material tumbling downhill.

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  6. Earth

    What can ‘silent earthquakes’ teach us about the next Big One?

    Earthquakes usually last seconds. But sometimes, they can last days, or even years. Here’s what scientists are learning about these “slow-slip events.”

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  7. Earth

    Scientists Say: Magma and lava

    The word magma refers to molten rock deep inside Earth. That rock is called lava when it reaches Earth’s surface.

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  8. Earth

    Rock rising from below the Atlantic may drive continents apart

    Molten rock rising from the deep mantle at the Mid-Atlantic Ridge may drive plate tectonics there more than had been expected.

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  9. Earth

    Scientists Say: Earthquake

    An earthquake is a sudden and sometimes violent shaking of the ground.

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