Animals

  1. Animals

    News stories about spiders are unfairly negative

    Nearly half of news stories about people-spider encounters contain errors, according to a new study. And those falsehoods tend to have a negative spin.

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  2. Animals

    Sea sponges spew slow-motion snot rockets to clear out their pores

    Sea sponges rely on a sneezing technique to clear their pores. The mucus flushes out debris — and provides a snack for other marine life.

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  3. Animals

    Whale sharks may be the world’s largest omnivores

    Chemical clues in the sharks’ skin show that the animals eat and digest algae.

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  4. Animals

    When bees are away, moths come out to pollinate

    Camera footage reveals that moths make roughly a third of the visits to red clover, working under the cover of night.

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  5. Life

    Your face is mighty mite-y. And that’s a good thing

    Tiny face mites live in our pores, getting food and shelter in return for eating our skin waste. A new study shows they can’t live without us.

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  6. Fossils

    Warm feathers may have helped dinos survive mass Triassic die-off

    Dinosaurs may have weathered freezing conditions about 202 million years ago, thanks to warm feathery coats.

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  7. Animals

    The top side of an elephant’s trunk is surprisingly stretchy

    Research on elephant trunks could inspire new artificial skins for soft robots.

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  8. Fossils

    This big dino had tiny arms before T. rex made them cool

    A predecessor to Tyrannosaurus rex, Meraxes gigas had a giant head. But the muscularity of its puny arms suggests those limbs served some purpose.

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  9. Animals

    Gophers might be farmers, a controversial study suggests

    Pocket gophers air out and fertilize the soil in a way that amounts to simple farming, two researchers claim. But not everyone agrees.

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  10. Fossils

    Great white sharks may be partly to blame for the end of megalodons

    Zinc levels in shark teeth hint that megalodons and great whites competed for food — and great whites won.

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  11. Tech

    Like an octopus, this glove lets fingers grip slippery objects

    The octopus-inspired suckers on each fingertip grab and release objects on demand.

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  12. Animals

    Why these jumping toadlets get confused mid-flight

    The tiny pumpkin toadlet tumbles when it jumps. Its ear canals may be too tiny to help the animal track its motion through the air.

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