MS-PS2-4

Construct and present arguments using evidence to support the claim that gravitational interactions are attractive and depend on the masses of interacting objects.

More Stories in MS-PS2-4

  1. Physics

    Explainer: The fundamental forces

    Four fundamental forces control all interactions between matter, from the smallest subatomic particles to the largest structures in the universe.

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  2. Physics

    A new device uses atoms’ quantum weirdness to peer underground

    Quantum sensors like this one could monitor magma beneath volcanoes or uncover archaeological artifacts.

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  3. Physics

    Explainer: How do mass and weight differ?

    Learn why these terms aren’t the same and which to use where. And should you report your results in kilograms? Pounds? If in doubt, try using newtons.

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  4. Tech

    This crumb-sized camera uses artificial intelligence to get big results

    Researchers have developed a camera the size of a coarse grain of salt that takes amazingly clear photos.

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  5. Physics

    Scientists Say: Mass

    Mass shows how much an object resists speeding up or slowing down when force is applied — a measure of how much matter is in it.

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  6. Physics

    Staying grounded in space requires artificial gravity

    On TV, people in space walk around like they’re on Earth. How can science give real astronauts artificial gravity? Spin right round, baby.

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  7. Physics

    Light levitation might help explore Earth’s ‘ignorosphere’

    A toy called a light mill inspired researchers to invent a new way to fly. They’re using light to levitate small nanotube-coated discs.

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  8. Space

    NASA’s Parker probe spots rogue waves and magnetic islands on the sun

    The Parker probe’s first data is giving scientists a look at what’s to come as the craft moves closer to the sun over the next few years.

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  9. Space

    Explainer: Understanding meteors and meteor showers

    Meteors regularly enter Earth’s atmosphere. Most ‘shooting stars’ pose few risks to life on the ground, but the rare big ones can be lethal.

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