HS-LS1-2

Develop and use a model to illustrate the hierarchical organization of interacting systems that provide specific functions within multicellular organisms.

  1. Animals

    Here’s how sea otters stay warm without blubber or a large body

    For the smallest mammal in the ocean, staying warm is tough. Now, scientists have figured out how the animals’ cells rise to the challenge.

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  2. Animals

    Abdominal fuzz makes bee bodies super slippery

    Scientists find that tiny hairs on a honeybee’s abdomen reduce wear and tear as a bee’s outer skeletal parts rub against each other all day long.

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  3. Animals

    Uncovering secrets of the glasswing butterfly’s see-through wings

    The tricks of its transparency include sparse, spindly scales and a waxy coated membrane.

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  4. Animals

    A bubble of air lets some lizards breathe underwater

    Anolis lizards leap into streams to escape danger. Now researchers have figured out how they can stay underwater for up to a quarter of an hour.

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  5. Animals

    Most species of beetles pee differently than other insects

    Scientists uncover their unique system for balancing ions and water. The findings may hint at why beetles are the most diverse animals on Earth.

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  6. Health & Medicine

    Cool Jobs: Saliva offers a spitting image of our health

    Scientists are using this secretion to study our body’s functions, to test for disease and even to diagnose injury.

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  7. Brain

    Explainer: What is a neuron?

    From the moment you are born, cells called neurons sense information, process it and then pass it on. Neurons allow you to do everything that you do.

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  8. Brain

    Search for ‘rewards’ is big driver in remodeling a teen’s brain

    Communication ‘highways’ in the brain undergo a major overhaul as children morph into adults. Dopamine plays a big role in this remodeling project.

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  9. Brain

    Scientists Say: Neuron

    Neurons are the foundational cells in the nervous system. They pass along and process information using electrical signals.

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  10. Health & Medicine

    Teen depression linked to how the brain processes rewards

    Depression in teens alters their brains’ pathways in ways that may put those kids at risk of lifelong mental-health problems — unless they get help.

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  11. Space

    Space travel may harm health by damaging cells’ powerhouses

    Biochemical changes after going to space suggest that harm to cells’ energy-producing structures, called mitochondria, could explain astronauts’ health issues.

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  12. Scientists Say: Respiration

    Breathe in and out, that’s respiration. Have a cell break down sugars for energy, and that’s respiration too.

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