HS-LS2-2

Use mathematical representations to support and revise explanations based on evidence about factors affecting biodiversity and populations in ecosystems of different scales.

More Stories in HS-LS2-2

  1. Animals

    Let’s learn about amphibians

    Amphibians are named after the Greek word for “double life” because many transform from water dwellers to landlubbers as they grow up.

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  2. Oceans

    Night lights make even the seas bright

    Light from coastal cities and offshore development may shine deep enough to disrupt tiny critters living dozens of meters (yards) below the surface.

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  3. Animals

    Infected caterpillars become zombies that climb to their deaths

    By tampering with genes involved in vision, a virus can send caterpillars on a doomed quest for sunlight.

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  4. Environment

    Ponds made to control floods can spew climate-warming gases, study finds

    Younger stormwater ponds can release more carbon in gases than they absorb, a study finds. That could aggravate global warming.

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  5. Microbes

    Kitchen sponges are bacteria’s dream home

    Sponges are favorite spots for bacteria, partly because of the mixed-housing environment that the cleaner-uppers offer microbes.

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  6. Animals

    Analyze This: Birds may decorate nests to scare off rivals

    Birds that nest in holes face stiff competition for nest sites. Some use feathers, also found where predators have made a kill, to keep rivals away.

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  7. Life

    Explainer: What is an endangered species?

    Threats such as climate change and habitat loss can put species at risk of going extinct. Different words describe that risk.

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  8. Environment

    Bees and butterflies struggle to find flowers in polluted air

    Emissions from cars and trucks make it harder for insects to find flowers. That in turn reduces flower visits and pollination, a new study finds.

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  9. Environment

    Widely used pesticides may threaten Earth’s ozone layer

    Data show a major class of long-used “eco-friendly” copper chemicals unexpectedly react with soil, making gases harmful to Earth’s protective ozone layer.

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