MS-LS2-4

Construct an argument supported by empirical evidence that changes to physical or biological components of an ecosystem affect populations.

More Stories in MS-LS2-4

  1. Oceans

    Night lights make even the seas bright

    Light from coastal cities and offshore development may shine deep enough to disrupt tiny critters living dozens of meters (yards) below the surface.

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  2. Environment

    Ponds made to control floods can spew climate-warming gases, study finds

    Younger stormwater ponds can release more carbon in gases than they absorb, a study finds. That could aggravate global warming.

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  3. Microbes

    Kitchen sponges are bacteria’s dream home

    Sponges are favorite spots for bacteria, partly because of the mixed-housing environment that the cleaner-uppers offer microbes.

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  4. Life

    Explainer: What is an endangered species?

    Threats such as climate change and habitat loss can put species at risk of going extinct. Different words describe that risk.

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  5. Environment

    Bees and butterflies struggle to find flowers in polluted air

    Emissions from cars and trucks make it harder for insects to find flowers. That in turn reduces flower visits and pollination, a new study finds.

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  6. Environment

    Recycling a climate-warming gas could make ‘greener’ farmed fish

    Instead of warming the climate, methane gas can be collected to help farmers. Along the way, it may also save some fish.

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  7. Ecosystems

    Rewilding returns lost species to strengthen ecosystems

    Restoring the missing species can help undo human-caused problems by aiding forests, slowing climate change and reducing wildfires.

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  8. Animals

    Baleen whales eat — and poop — a lot more than we thought

    The amount of food that some whales eat and then poop out suggests these animals have a powerful influence over ocean ecosystems.

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  9. Climate

    Here’s how some sea-loving trees ended up far from the coast

    This “relict ecosystem” that’s more than thousands of years old moved inland due to warming and a rise in sea levels.

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