HS-PS4-1

Use mathematical representations to support a claim regarding relationships among the frequency, wavelength, and speed of waves traveling in various media.

More Stories in HS-PS4-1

  1. Physics

    Scientists Say: Ultrasonic

    This word describes sound waves that have frequencies too high for human ears to hear.

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  2. Tech

    Talking through a tube can trick AI into mistaking one voice for another

    Researchers crafted tubes that can trick AI into mistaking one person’s voice for another’s. Bad guys could use such tricks to hack into accounts.

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  3. Physics

    Scientists Say: Radio Waves

    Lightning, stars, supermassive black holes and more give off radio waves.

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  4. Oceans

    How would a mermaid sound underwater?

    Human ears don’t work well in the water. A mermaid would need marine creature features to talk to and understand her aquatic friends.

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  5. Plants

    A single particle of light can kick off photosynthesis

    In a new experiment with bacteria, a lone photon sparked the process of turning light to chemical energy.

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  6. Physics

    Shouting into the wind may seem futile — but it’s really not

    Sending a sound upwind, against the flow of air, actually makes the sound louder — only it doesn’t sound that way to the person making the noise.

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  7. Materials Science

    Analyze This: A new fabric mimics polar bears’ pelts for warmth

    With layers that work like polar bears’ skin and fur, a material absorbs light and keeps it from escaping.

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  8. Planets

    In a first, telescopes have caught a star eating a planet

    A burst of light and a cloud of dust are signs that a distant star swallowed a giant planet.

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  9. Tech

    Nanocrystal ‘painted’ films may someday help relieve summer heat

    The rainbow palette and cooling powers of new plant-based films comes from their microscopic surface patterns of tiny crystals.

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