MS-PS1-2

Analyze and interpret data on the properties of substances before and after the substances interact to determine if a chemical reaction has occurred.

More Stories in MS-PS1-2

  1. Materials Science

    New cloth cools you when you’re hot, warms you when you’re cold

    Scientists 3-D printed the new fabric, which has even more tricks up its sleeve — such as conducting electricity and resisting radio waves.

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  2. Materials Science

    A disinfectant made from sawdust knocks out deadly microbes

    It’s made by pressure-cooking sawdust and water, is cheap and easy to make — and could lead to greener cleaning products than chemicals used today.

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  3. Chemistry

    New process can transform urban CO2 pollution into a resource

    Researchers have developed a liquid metal that breaks down carbon dioxide in the air, converting it from a climate threat into a valuable raw material.

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  4. Physics

    Why some icicles become scallops not spikes

    The newfound — and at times quirky — shapes reflect the density of water surrounding submerged ice.

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  5. Environment

    Widely used pesticides may threaten Earth’s ozone layer

    Data show a major class of long-used “eco-friendly” copper chemicals unexpectedly react with soil, making gases harmful to Earth’s protective ozone layer.

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  6. Planets

    No, organic molecules alone don’t point to life on Mars

    These carbon-based molecules, found in a meteorite, may reflect merely a mixing of water and minerals on the Red Planet over billions of years.

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  7. Materials Science

    Let’s learn about glass

    Unlike the atoms in other solids, the atoms in glass don’t exist in an orderly crystal structure. They’re more jumbled up, like the atoms inside liquids.

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  8. Chemistry

    Snail slime + gold could boost the power of sunscreens and more

    These two strange ingredients could make skin-care products that are better for both our skin and the environment.

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  9. Chemistry

    Explainer: What is a metal?

    Metals can bend and pull without snapping, and conduct electricity. The reason: Their atoms tend to lose electrons to neighboring atoms.

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