Maria Temming

Assistant Editor, Science News Explores

Maria Temming is the assistant editor at Science News Explores. Maria has undergraduate degrees in physics and English from Elon University and a master's degree in science writing from MIT. She has written for Scientific AmericanSky & Telescope and NOVA Next. She’s also a former staff writer at Science News.

All Stories by Maria Temming

  1. Earth

    The weird sky glow called STEVE is really confusing scientists

    Researchers are trying to figure out the recipe of atmospheric conditions that creates this aurora-like light show.

  2. Animals

    Let’s learn about birdwatching for beginners

    One birdwatcher unpacks the personal and scientific rewards of birding, and how to get started.

  3. Materials Science

    Scientists Say: 2-D Material

    Two-dimensional materials such as graphene could improve electronics, carbon capture and more.

  4. Animals

    A newfound type of hedgehog is small, dark and adorable

    At first, this hedgehog was mistaken for a lookalike relative. But its teeth, skull shape and DNA confirmed it as a new species.

  5. Materials Science

    Let’s learn about graphene

    Scientists have been trying to understand and harness this material’s superpowers since its discovery in 2004.

  6. Physics

    Scientists Say: Polarized light

    Sunlight, lamplight and other lights are usually unpolarized. But passing light waves through filters can ‘polarize’ them.

  7. Tech

    Let’s learn about the benefits of playing video games

    Too much screentime poses health risks, but research suggests playing video games can sharpen some skillsets.

  8. Physics

    Scientists Say: Coriolis Effect

    Because Earth spins, airborne objects traveling far and fast — such as airplanes — experience deflections in their motion.

  9. Tech

    Let’s learn about flying drones for science

    Airborne robots help researchers keep tabs on wildlife, agriculture and more.

  10. Physics

    Scientists Say: Muon

    Tracking muons raining down on Earth can reveal new details of pyramids, volcanoes and thunderstorms.

  11. Math

    Let’s learn about mathematical mysteries

    There are still many mysteries about numbers, shapes and other aspects of math that have yet to be solved.

  12. Math

    Scientists Say: Prime number

    Prime numbers’ unique quality — being divisible only by themselves and one — makes them useful for encrypting secret information.