HS-PS2-6

Communicate scientific and technical information about why the molecular-level structure is important in the functioning of designed materials.

  1. Environment

    For a better brick, just add poop

    Sewage sludge. Cow dung. They’re not just waste — scientists are finding uses for processed poop in construction materials.

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  2. Tech

    Insect-inspired drones work together to 3-D print structures

    For the first time, flying drones have 3-D printed structures. In the future, such drones might be able to build in hard-to-reach places.

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  3. Tech

    Underwater cameras get a new power source — sound!

    Needing no batteries, a new digital camera can run almost continuously to offer new, deeper insights into the ocean world.

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  4. Animals

    Tiny bumps on polar bear paws help them get traction on snow

    Super-small structures on the Arctic animals’ paws might offer extra friction that keeps them from slipping on snow, a new study concludes.

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  5. Physics

    Explainer: What is friction?

    The force of friction always acts to slow things down. It depends on just two factors: the surfaces and how hard they press together.

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  6. Tech

    A tool as small as a human cell can scan for contaminants and more

    Tiny spectrometers might someday show up on smart devices. They could help people scan for ingredients or contaminants in foods and other materials.

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  7. Environment

    This chemist uses online videos to teach about the perils of microplastics

    Imari Walker says her journey as a scientist and science communicator lets her talk about and advocate for her passion.

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  8. Chemistry

    Explainer: What is a hydrogel?

    These unusual materials have a host of unusual properties. You can even make a starch-infused version in your kitchen.

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  9. Environment

    ‘Forever’ chemicals show up in students’ school uniforms

    Researchers found PFAS “forever chemicals” in kids’ school uniforms and other clothing. Studies have linked these compounds to health risks.

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  10. Tech

    A shape-shifting robotic tooth-cleaner might one day brush for you

    A swarm of billions of magnetic, bacteria-killing nanoparticles can be shaped into bristles to fit any surface, including between teeth.

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  11. Chemistry

    Could we make vibranium?

    The ‘perfect’ metal may belong to the fictitious Marvel world of Wakanda, but scientists hope to one day mimic some of its key traits.

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  12. Materials Science

    These fabrics change color as they stretch

    Stretchy, color-shifting cloth may lead to new art, fashions and sensors. A century-old Nobel-prize-winning invention served as its inspiration.

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