MS-PS2-3

Ask questions about data to determine the factors that affect the strength of electric and magnetic forces.

  1. Animals

    Analyze This: Electric eels’ zaps are more powerful than a TASER

    Shocking! A biologist reached his hand into a fish tank and let an electric eel zap him. It let him measure precisely how strong a current it could unleash to defend itself.

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  2. Tech

    Teen’s invention could help light up bikes at night

    A teen researcher from Georgia has developed a light that could replace reflectors on bike wheels. Flexing tires provide all the power it needs.

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  3. Tech

    Father and son harness magnetic fields for new type of 3-D printing

    A dad and his son have developed a new 3-D printing method in their basement. It harnesses pulsed magnetic fields to build metal objects one tiny aluminum drop at a time.

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  4. Physics

    Weird physics warps nearby star’s light

    Scientists have observed a bizarre effect of quantum physics in light coming from a nearby neutron star.

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  5. Materials Science

    3-D printers offer better way to make some magnets

    3-D printers produced magnets as strong as conventional ones with less material wasted.

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  6. Tech

    Clear, stretchy sensor could lead to wearable electronics

    Researchers have combined plastics and metal to make a transparent, stretchable sensor. It could soon find use in touchscreens, wearable electronics and more.

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  7. Animals

    The shocking electric eel!

    Electric eels are fascinating animals. Their powerful zaps can act like a radar system, trick fish into revealing their location and then freeze their prey’s movements.

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  8. Physics

    Boom! Sounding out the enemy

    Armistice Day marked the end of the Great War. But what arguably won the war was acoustics — the science of sound. It allowed Allied troops to home in on and rout the enemy.

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  9. Brain

    Magnets may make helmets safer

    Magnets in sports helmets could repel players’ heads as they move toward a collision. This should reduce the risk of the hard hits that lead to concussions.

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  10. Computing

    Electricity: Cutting the cords

    Engineers are working to charge more wireless gadgets — without relying on cords and plugs.

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  11. Earth

    How Earth’s surface morphs

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  12. Physics

    Like electricity, but magnetic

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